Don’t Miss Our Chef’s Table at The Painted Fish!

So many people asking when we’re going to do a Chef’s Table up here in the mountains!

Well now that summer and the leaves are behind us…we’re diving in! We hope this is the first of many.

We’re back for deliciousness on the Rock! We’re headed to beautiful Banner Elk to spread some holiday foodie cheer at the one and only The Painted Fish Cafe & Beer Bar, where we’ll let the renowned Chef Tom Jankovich surprise us with multiple courses. The cafe is typically closed on Monday nights, so Chef is opening it up to us for a private event.  This night of tastiness is sure to send you off into the final week before Christmas with a happy heart and belly.

 

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I’m telling you. I’ve had some major yummy meals at The Painted Fish. Like Tom’s special seafood cakes.  And the blueberry goat cheese pie!

 

The Painted Fish Cafe & Beer Bar is known for its unique twist on recognizable dishes with locally sourced ingredients. See why so many of us “mountain folk” travel across the hills and valleys to dine and enjoy Chef Tom’s cuisine in his upscale yet relaxed restaurant. He’s always there manning the kitchen and bringing colorful dishes to tempt your eyes and taste buds.  And the slopes are now snow covered, so you’ll enjoy a wonderful view at the foot of beautiful Sugar Mountain Ski Resort.

Are you knew to our Chef’s Table events? It’s like a wonderful supper club. Join us here at one of our preliminary mountain events…and see why our Chef’s Table events down the mountain have become so well regarded for the past two years.

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Here’s how it works:
Reserve with a ticket here and you’ll join us at our table on Monday, December 17 at 6:30pm. A reminder of our pricing: Your ticket price of $45 INCLUDES your multi-course dinner as well as tax and gratuity associated with the meal. Beverage (and gratuity for the purchase of beverages) are not included in the ticket price. Please take care of your server on any beverage service. We have the whole restaurant to ourselves, however seating will be limited. We’ll see you on December 17th!

** Follow us on Facebook for the latest details and get in on the chatter by tagging @PaintedFishCafe and #triadfoodiesChefsTable on Facebook and Instagram. Please notify me at Kristi@triadfoodies.com if you have any food sensitivity or if the chef needs to be aware of any concerns.

Seating will be limited.  Get tickets here!

Mission Pizza Napoletana

It’s easy to talk pizza when it’s your mission in life.

And yes, we’re talking pizza today. But we also wanted you to get to know our favorite “pizza geek” a little bit better. 

ps: you can find the YES! Weekly version of this story here

Mission Pizza Napoletana has been enjoying business in downtown Winston-Salem for almost five years.  Owner and pizza-maker-in-chief, Peyton Smith, fell in love with Neapolitan style pizza after a visit to Naples, Italy years ago.  When the economy was in a state of flux, Smith started out as a mobile pizza business, “My inspiration was to produce the exact kind of pizza you’ll find in Naples.” 

Peyton Smith, Mission Pizza Napoletana, outside pizzeria

And it made perfect sense at the time, since the pizza, which originated in Naples is actually a street food. “Napoletana pizza, or Neapolitan pizza, is the original pizza,” Smith explains.  Established circa 1800’s, Napoletana pizza is wood-fired at temperatures that reach 1000 degrees for about 90 seconds or less.  What you get is a light pizza, with a crispy cornicione (that’s crust to you and me).  Sounds pretty basic and simple, right? But to hear Smith describe it, it’s almost poetic to achieve the perfect Neapolitan style pizza. “It starts with high-quality flour, but the big thing for a finished product is the baking method.  A stone hearth or live fire, traditionally wood-fire, cooking at about 800-1000 degrees,” Smith says. “Because of the nature of the high heat and softer flour which gives you a pliable dough, the interior crumb is soft with an open cell structure. And it’s not crunchy, but the veneer has crispiness.” Smith adds, “It can be folded and that’s encouraged. The tell-tale sign is you can fold Neapolitan pizza and it doesn’t crack.” It also allows use to use your hands to eat it, which Smith encourages because it requires all the senses.

The poetry doesn’t stop there. Now Smith is on a roll. “The pizza should smell sweet and bready, with a little blistering, which are the small black or dark brown spots and it should have micro-bubbles.” Because it’s a softer product and baked at a high heat at minute to minute and a half, Smith says what goes on top is important. Or not.  “It should be topped with light ingredients. The dough is the fundamental starting point, but it should work in balance with the other toppings, like a fresh cheese, salumi, tomato, herbs.” And then, “Finally, it should be light on the stomach. You can crush that whole thing and feel satisfied and not heavy in the gut. If we can do all that right, we’ve produced something pretty special.” 

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It’s best consumed right out of the oven. My personal fave at Mission is the Billy Jowl with its ricotta cream, smoked mozzarella, guanciale, fennel pollen, black pepper, oregano. Yum…my mouth waters just thinking about it. Sorry no decent photo. Just trust me.  The Margherita is also incredible and it’s how the youngest learned that he loves basil. The Diavola is another with its fresh mozzarella, hot sopressata, chilis, honey, pecorino, basil (below). 

 

Smith says though ingredients are extremely important, like the flour and the tomatoes, he doesn’t import a lot and gets many ingredients locally. “I use an Italian ethos but I want to use as many local ingredients as possible. An our tools and technique are very important here.” One of the major tools is the huge pizza oven that takes center stage in the kitchen.  Built by Stefano Ferrara, a third-generation oven builder, it’s hand-made, brick-by-brick with a traditional low dome for the ultimate in wood-fired high-temperature retention. 

Although a self-proclaimed pizza geek, Smith conceives the menu as well as plating, and likes people to know that his mission is actually more than just pizza. The name Mission Pizza Napoletana should indicate that their pizza is not what you’re accustomed to.  He asserts, “We’re really an osteria, a small tavern with a limited full-service menu that happens to be pizza-centric. I love the non-pizza items we dish out like our salads, pastas and appetizers.” Few are the places where you can get freshly made pasta.  “On occasion we do sheeted pastas and cut into noodles, we make stuffed pasta. Right now we’re making a cavatelli for our bolognese. Our wood-fired oven is used to finish other dishes, like our cauliflower, which has a life of its own.  And on the weekend, we can do funky stuff like porchetta, lamb shank and the occasional whole fish.”

 

(photo cred: MPN)

Smith’s approach landed him an opportunity this summer to cook pizza alongside 25 of the top American pizza makers at the New York Pizza Festival. “These are makers who really are executing pizza at a high level.  It was a humbling experience to be invited. I got to hang out with my friends and make pizza all day.”  Smith also met Mayor Bill de Blasio. “We had a nice chat. He was really interested in our ingredients. We fed him our pizza and he wouldn’t put it down.”

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The pizza man and the mayor

Not too shabby for a chef with no formal culinary training, however Smith has worked in the restaurant business in nearly every capacity from bussing to serving.  “When I was resolute about opening a place, I worked with Chef Jim Noble and I gave him al that I had. I developed a passion for food 20 years ago and how it’s a vehicle for lubricating social celebrations.  I’ve taken a real interest in learning techniques and have curiosity about how things are done. The biggest thing for me and thinking about food and the plate. There’s no doubt about how I want it to taste and look.” Smith says he gets much inspiration from travel.  “I want to eat the best food I can, wherever I am. It gives a really excellent perspective of how things are executed at a high level. Back in my kitchen, whether someone likes what we do or not, we certainly know what we wanted to do.”

As for his place in the very communal Winston-Salem food scene, Smith, who grew up here, says he has enjoyed the support and he’s proud of how they’re executing at a high level. “I’m happy with what we do and I intend on making us better every day.”

Mission Pizza Napoletana is located at 707 Trade Street NW, Winston-Salem. Open Tues-Thurs 5pm-9pm; Friday & Saturday 11am-2pm and 5pm-10pm.  missionpizzanapoletana.com 

foodie b’eat: Bistro B is Sold

Aw, foodies. I’m sad. My beloved Bistro B has been sold and Chef Tim Bocholis is “passing the torch.”

Bistro B is basically the reason I became a food writer. It was within those walls eating those plates of food that the inspiration for starting a blog began. Bistro Blog. Bistro Bocholis. Bistro B.

I’d get on my  high horse in the early days circa 2010 and berate those who stood in line at Chain Lobster and Olive Chain and why oh why weren’t you at THE B???

But eventually, Bistro B became the place to BE in Kernersville, NC.  I wrote about them here.  And have gabbed often on FB.

Such deliciousness. Anyhoo….I cry.

Bistro B  has been sold and owner and Chef Tim Bocholis has announced that he’s off to new adventures. Though he’s not exactly saying what’s next, this weekend is Bocholis’ last weekend as chef. 

Here’s what he wrote in today’s newsletter: “After many heartfelt & wonderful years here at Bistro B Tapas & Wine Bar, the time has come for me to pass the torch to embark on a new & exciting adventure,” Bocholis announced. “To all that have enjoyed our dining experiences over the years, I truly appreciate your unwavering patronage and support! I can’t find words adequate enough to express my sincere appreciation. You have made my experience here at Bistro B the joy of a lifetime.”

Bistro B was the first fine dining choice in Kernersville. People from across the Triad would visit to get a taste of Bocholis’ unique take on Mediterranean cuisine and tapas. Bocholis adds, “Coming to a decision to turn over the fruits of hard labor was difficult, to say the least, for me and my family. However, the comfort I feel with the new owners is indescribable. I totally endorse and support their vision.”   

The new proprietors, Bob and Trey Prescott will be operating the restaurant with a new concept. It will be called “The Prescott” and is said offer a modern farm-to-table concept. 

So sad to see you go, Chef! Thanks for the deliciousness and some pretty interesting tales from the square.  Now, foodies…there’s going to be a “new” restaurant in Kvegas.

So, EAT LOCAL!

Hello Bistro Family and Friends

PASSING THE TORCH
After many heartfelt & wonderful years here atBistro B Tapas & Wine Bar, the time has come for me to “pass the torch” to embark on a new & exciting adventure. To all that have enjoyed our dining experiences over the years, I truly appreciate your unwavering patronage and support! I can’t find words adequate enough to express my sincere appreciation. You have made my experience here at Bistro B the joy of a lifetime.

To the new proprietors, Mr. Bob Prescott and son, Trey Prescott, my congratulations and I sincerely hope that you find much joy as well as prosperity in the years ahead. The Prescotts will continue to provide Kernersville and surrounding areas with exceptional food choices in a friendly and welcoming environment.

Coming to a decision to turn over the fruits of hard labor was difficult, to say the least, for me and my family. However, the comfort I feel in “passing the torch” to the new owners is indescribable. I totally endorse and support their vision and ask that you join me by frequently visiting their establishment.

Bistro B Tapas & Wine Bar would not have been possible without your support and I truly thank you and wish each of you the very best. Please reach out with questions or concerns at my email. Email: cheftimo007@hotmail.com

The new Restaurant will be named “The Prescott” offering A Modern Farm to Table concept. Email:theprescottrestaurant@gmail.com

This will be my last weekend here as Chef

With gratitude for your fine patronage,

Chef Timothy A Bocholis

AS ALWAYS WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE! LOOK FORWARD TO ENTERTAINING YOU SOON!

 

White Pinot Noir Could Be Your New Fave

Caleb Flint of Wine Merchants in WS offered me a bottle of Amity Vineyards White Pinot Noir, Willamette Valley 2017 for an honest review. We are grateful for the opportunity (and the wine). All opinions are my own.

My favorite kind of wine is red wine. And of the reds, my favorite has been Pinot Noir. And no that has nothing to do with the film, Sideways. 😀 . Though a Malbec sometimes does sometimes hit the spot.  I also do try to support NC Wine as much as possible but I do like to change up.  So when Wine Merchants talked about a White Pinot Noir, I was intrigued. After grabbing a bottle,  I took a little time and meal planning for when to enjoy it. Mr. foodie and I like wine, but we have two kiddos at home and sometimes we can’t just open a bottle up and enjoy. And we rarely finish a bottle between the two of us in one night. Plus, I wanted to have a mushroom pasta dish. I am particular like that.

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Then the night came. Opened up a bottle of the White Pinot on a pasta night. I enjoyed a glass while cooking. What we found was a lightly fruity, very clean wine with body that drinks quite easily alone and is wonderful with pasta, cheese and poultry and particularly, mushrooms. Bonus points if you can manage that in one dish, which we did (a browned butter balsamic mushroom sauce over ravioli with grilled chicken). The photo of the dish didn’t come out well. But I’ll make it again and share the recipe.

The wine went perfectly. I have a feeling this is going to be in the regular rotation.

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i see you

White Pinot Noir is gaining in popularity but is still considered somewhat “rare” compared to other varietals.  it takes a special process because Pinot Noir grapes are obviously red. This is an excerpt from VinePair.

To make white wine from red grapes, winemakers take careful steps to ensure that there is minimum contact, or maceration, between the pre-fermented must and color-giving grape skins. To eliminate maceration for white Pinot, only a small amount of the grape’s juice can be fermented into white wine.
Free-run juice is released when grapes are piled, and their skins break under their own weight. In white winemaking, this produces the highest quality wines because there’s minimal contact with bitter skins and seeds. Free-run juice, and occasionally must from a very light pressing, are used to make Blanc de Noirs still wines.

White Pinot Noir also listed as Pinot Noir Blanc or Blanc de Noirs.  In Winston-Salem, you can find Amity Vineyards for about $25 at Wine Merchants & Vin 205 Wine Bar at 205 S. Stratford Rd. in Winston-Salem.  (336) 765-8175.

By the way, if you haven’t been to Wine Merchants or the bistro next door, get yourself over there. The restaurant is one of the most underrated spots in all of the Triad. Read about them here.  Site of 2 Chef’s Tables! That’s how good.

Cheers!

The 411 on Canteen Market & Bistro

A previous version of this story can be found at YES! Weekly

Oh my, have I found my happy place!

Children get Disney. What’s my adventure land? A beautiful little restaurant that has a little market inside so I can order food, shop while I wait, or just swing in and shop, seeing something new every time. Look!

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That’s Canteen Market & Bistro. Billed as a gourmet market and dining experience, you have no doubt of its intended function as soon as you breeze in. Plus there’s a beautiful, communal bar right in the center to ground the entire gleaming 6,000 square foot space. It’s dreamy. Heaven I tell you! 

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The business, opened in September, is the love child of Claire Calvin and Eric Swaim, (I’m sorry if that sounds awkward).  She of The Porch Kitchen and Cantina and Swaim, her neighbor at Hoots Roller Bar and Beer Co at West End Millworks. The two had talked for a couple of years about opening up an urban market. When the space at 411 West 4th Street, also known as Commerce Plaza, became available, it was originally conceptualized by the property owners as a fine dining restaurant. But Claire and her dream of a downtown market with a distinct urban feel could not be dissuaded. “This space would be too big just a market or just a restaurant but altogether, it just works.”

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I have to agree. The market side of the restaurant features staples like pasta and sauces, some on the higher end, but still budget friendly for a night “in,” as well as local sauces like Ya’ll Sauce, made in Winston-Salem, and international sauces, mustards, grits, gourmet crackers, bread mixes, jams, jellies, endless varieties of pickles, you name it.

Mr. foodie will tell you that I get positively giddy in places like Canteen.

Claire says they’re just getting started and happily takes suggestions for fun items to add. During my visit there, she had to step away to help a customer who had a request for a product not on the shelves but Claire took note of it…the customer also had her arms full. She had come for one thing (don’t we all) and appeared to need a basket. Claire hastily retrieved a mini-cart. We joked that her budget was no longer limited by what she could carry in her arms and she went on her way.  So helpful! 

In the back, the dining area sits adjacent to a beautifully curated wine and beverage area,called “The Cellar,” with hard to find boutique wines, fortified and specialty styles, and local and international craft beer, kombucha, coffee and artisanal mixers featuring companies that have a story to tell.

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Eric and the bev team put a great deal of thought into the beverage program. The large communal space features the obligatory craft cocktail menu. For beer, there’s a NC focus behind the bar, with everything on draft while the cooler includes beers from around the world. And the wine at the bar boasts a relatively new, tap concept.  “All wine by the glass is all being poured draft. It eliminates waste and ensures freshness, which is something we really wanted to commit to. When it’s on draft, there’s no light and no oxygen to make it go bad. It’s the perfect temperature for white and for red and gives you control over your pour,” he says. “It’s very concise at the bar with a trip around the world in the back.”

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In front, the kitchen is where Chef Chris Almand, formerly of West End Cafe, is making menu items for the bistro for dine-in and take home and the pastry chef is making the sweet treats. The refrigerator case is stocked with local pimento cheese, goat cheese, deli items…items a customer can run in and grab to go for a quick snack or lunch on the run. Calvin says the menu will change often to reflect what is in season and what is available from their partner farm, Whit Acres.

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This restaurant and market is already seeing tons of support from the local restaurant community. It’s getting some much deserved attention. Y’all check it out! 

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Canteen will have an official grand opening this weekend featuring market samples, wine tastings, demonstrations and giveaways. Visit their social media for more details.

Wanna Go? Canteen Market and Bistro is located at 411 West Fourth Street, Winston-Salem. Hours are Monday-Sunday 10am-10pm.