Tag Archives: High Point

Review: Full Kee Chinese Restaurant

UPDATE:

Several weeks after this blog post, Full Key closed for business and Sue Chen retired. Since then, former owner George Yu came OUT of retirement and bought his restaurant back. It’s now called Tasty 100 and the menu and same great taste is back!  I hope to visit there soon and hopefully even have a Chef’s Table again. Until then, stay tuned and please visit Tasty 100 and show George some love!

You probably know by now (if you’ve been opening your email and clicking on the blog) that I’m am HERE for Full Kee Chinese Restaurant, a local eatery that calls itself “gourmet Chinese.”  We went back for a taste because I wanted to “research” it for a possible future Chef’s Table. And it did not disappoint. So here’s the review when I brought Sister Foodie with me on our foodie exploration.

You can read the full article for YES! Weekly here.

Full Kee has been located at 3793 Samet Drive since 2005.  It was owned and operated by George Yu, who had a very popular restaurant in Washington D.C. before he and his family moved to the Triad. What started as a takeout restaurant, Full Kee expanded into a cozy restaurant with beautiful Chinese art, dim lighting, and a full bar.  In May of last year, George retired and moved to Florida.  Sue Chen had been a partner with George in the early days but had since moved on. Now there was a very brief period of time between George selling and Sue buying the space that the restaurant was not itself.  For one, the restaurant was operated by someone else. Full Kee’s Chef, Carlos Lopez, who had worked under George’s tutelage for nearly a decade, had left to pursue another opportunity while that owner was in charge. The restaurant experienced some not so great reviews for a few weeks. Sue ultimately purchased the restaurant in November and the space its in and brought Carlos back. And now Full Kee has risen to its former glory. Some say it’s better than ever. Update: Carlos has moved on and Sue has a new chef in the kitchen, but all the recipes are the same.  UPDATE ON THE UPDATE: Sue retired and George Yu bought the place back and is in the kitchen. 

Back before my food writing days, Full Kee became a favorite. You can read that initial view here. I found it so interesting that there was actually a Chinese restaurant that claimed to be “gourmet”.  It just wasn’t the norm. Chinese was and is almost entirely takeout and often quite low-key (no pun intended). Full Kee invites your casually dressed self into an ambiance that feels like fine dining, but is very comfortable and inviting. The dim lighting is soft and elegant. And what was more thrilling, amazing, astonishing, is that my children ate their food. At a restaurant. It was then and there that my children discovered they love Asian food, specifically dumplings, stir fry rice and “sweet chicken” (as my son calls it). To this day, General chicken is is favorite food (besides brownies). 

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Egg Drop Soup: If you’re an egg drop soup fan, you’ll love this light broth with the ribbon of yolks. It doesn’t have that off-putting corn starch-like consistency. My sister, who was dining with me the evening we visited, it’s the best egg drop soup she’s ever had and that she ever feels a cold coming on, she knows where she’s headed.

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Lettuce Wraps: A perennial favorite with romaine lettuce and finely minced chicken with  vegetables. They are always a crowed pleaser for the table. The chicken was mild and seasoned wonderfully and the cool, crisp lettuce acts in contrast to the tiny hint of heat.

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Dumplings: Carlos makes all the dumpling wrappers from scratch. The result is a delicate dumpling exterior, tender on top, crispy on the bottom, while it lets the filling shine through. It comes with the typical sweet and savory dipping sauce. It is the perfect appetizer. 

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Spring Rolls: You just can’t not get some spring rolls when you eat Asian food amirite? They were super hot, super crispy, came with two dipping sauces and fab.

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General Tao Chicken: According to Sue, it is one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes (as it is in just about any Chinese restaurant). Full Kee’s General chicken, with its secret ingredient in the sauce, is light and crispy and not full of breading like you might find with ordinary takeout. “We wanted it ti be a bigger piece of chicken, but not heavy with flour and not cooked too long. It’s crispy outside and tender inside,” Sue told me.  It’s wonderful. And what often comes off as an afterthought, the broccoli is al dente and actually flavorful. Sue says, “It used to be just very plain, but I asked Carlos to add more seasoning.” The result is broccoli with a hint of garlic and it’s perfectly cooked.

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Walnut Shrimp: These firm, juicy jumbo shrimp are lightly crisped in the same manner as the General Tao’s, but the sauce is a bit more robust and amber in color with crunchy walnuts in the mixture.  I highly recommend this dish as well as the Philomela Shrimp, which has a creamier sauce. Or you can get the Full Kee Shrimp, which is a combo of the two. Both come with the same tasty garlic.

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Mongolian Beef: Customers will notice a change to this dish as the protein portion has been increased and the onions have decreased. It’s very savory and peppery and hearty.

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The menu includes a wide variety of traditional Chinese noodle and rice dishes, including Stir-Fry Rice, Stir Fry Sea Bass, Boneless Duck and Curry. Sue has also recruited a wine connoisseur to help patrons with the perfect wine selection.  We agree with Sue that everyone in your dining party should order something different from one another.  “We want everyone to be able to try a little bit of everything.  It’s the best way to enjoy Chinese.”

Full Kee has retained its loyal following of customers, some of whom have a place at the table every Friday night. Andrew Priddy, who lives outside Winston-Salem, says they’ve been loyal since 2010. “We travel a lot. And this by far is our favorite restaurant. Great food, great service. They’re like family. We just love it.”

Tasty 100 Asian Restaurant
3793 Samet Dr, Ste 140
High Point, NC

Announcing our June Chef’s Table at Full Kee Chinese Restaurant

Hi, foodies!

We are on a roll with these Chef’s Tables. I am just little Mrs. Foodie Planner.  We just came off an incredible and delicious, mind-blowing globally influenced Creole meal with Chef Jody Morphis at Blue Denim in Greensboro (aka Jeansboro).

Fortunately for our restaurants, but unfortunately for the blog reader, some of our events have sold out before I even get to announce it on my blog. Today, I’m ahead of the game to announce our June 19 Chef’s Table will be with the one and only Full Kee Gourmet Chinese Restaurant and it is going to be epic! It’s the best Chinese in the Triad and a favorite of so many people here.

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Here are the details!  Click here to get tickets if details don’t matter .

Folks….we’re going to High Point to share with you the BEST BEST Chinese in all the Triad. Full Kee has been renowned for its “gourmet” Chinese cuisine for over 10 years.  Nope,  this isn’t your typical takeout fare. It’s elegant dining and gourmet Chinese and I promise you, you do not want to miss it.

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As former owner, George Yu, has retired to the Sunshine State, new owner Sue Chen has helped Full Kee retain and exceeed its former glory. Chef Carlos Lopez learned everything he knows from George and has further refined and enhanced his culinary talents with Cantonese cuisine.  From the handmade dumpling wrappers to delicate stir fry bass and savory boneless duck, you’ll be impressed with this family-style event at Full Kee.

Here’s how it works:

Reserve with a ticket here and you’ll join us at our table on Wednesday, June 19 at 7:00pm. A reminder of our pricing: Your ticket price of $35 INCLUDES your multi-course dinner as well as tax and gratuity associated with the meal. Beverage (and gratuity for the purchase of beverages) are not included in the ticket price. Please take care of your server on any beverage service. A reminder that seating will be limited. We’ll see you on June 19! Come early for drinks and relax for a bit. Full Kee has a full bar and a great wine program.

** It’s super fun to attend Chef’s Tables with friends! We totally get it. However if you are unable to arrive early and all at once with your party, please let us know in advance that you’d like to be seated together and we’ll make every effort to accomodate your request. This is especially helpful if your tickets were not purchased under one name.

** Follow us on Facebook for the latest details and get in on the chatter by tagging @FullKeeRestaurant #triadfoodiesChefsTable on Facebook and Instagram. Please notify me at Kristi@triadfoodies.com if you have any food sensitivity or if the chef needs to be aware of any concerns

 

 

foodie b’eat: The Best of Asian in the Triad via CHOW in YES! Weekly

This might be more of a refresher for some of you who are more regular readers of the blog. Here’s a checklist of some of our fave Asian spots across the Triad.  It’s all in my latest CHOW article in YES! Weekly.

By the way, since we went to press, we found another that we really love. nOma Food is a new fast casual restaurant on Battleground Avenue. They officially open Monday, August 24. You must check them out. They are fab. Especially love their curry and the beef rice bowl! Enjoy, foodies! PS…if you don’t see a fave, let me know what I’m missing.

Sushi Republic

Marozzi’s Pizzeria

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So the microfoodies and my mom-in-law foodie were looking for a local place to eat that everyone would enjoy as we were leaving the Palladium Theatre in High Point. As you may know, that area is surrounded by lots of chains. But after a quick scan, we noticed a local pizzeria that was highly reviewed on Four Square so, I excitedly dragged everyone there. 🙂

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Map of Italia...what else?

Map of USA AND Italia…what else?

Marozzi’s Pizzeria is down the street from a major Italian restaurant chain and hidden behind some other retail establishments. And it is facing The Palladium. So there’s you reference point. We simply wanted pizza so we walked up and ordered half cheese for the kidlets and half special for the grown-ups. They bring the order to your table. They have real NY Style and Sicilian pizza along with pasta, calzones & stromboli, heroes and salads. What more do you need?

Here’s the owner, Mike! And here is giving us a pizza show. He’s very nice so make sure you say “hello” when you visit and tell them you read about his pizzeria on triadfoodies!

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The pizza was delicious. Crispy and slightly chewy crust, the cheese was melted perfectly on the kidlets side and the veggies were slightly al dente on the adult side. Both were great. I’ve said before that regular ol’ cheese is really my favorite pizza but the “specia”l side was very enjoyable and felt a little healthy since the veggies weren’t cooked to mush. Just forget about the pepperoni, right?

Omygoodness, doesn’t it look delicious???

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microfoodie will eat pizza

microfoodie will eat pizza

Now, Marozzi’s probably owns the title of biggest single slices in the Triad. These things are enormous. I don’t have a picture of one because diners don’t like it when strangers ask to take pictures of their dinner. Go figure. But I did catch them making a 26-inch (26-inch!) pie. I’ve never seen a pizza that big. That’s what they make for their slices. You should see the box. I don’t know how it fits in someone’s car. 

IMG_6153 IMG_6154 IMG_6156  He has to fold it over to fit on the peel. HUGE!

So when you are surrounded by all those chains on Eastchester at Wendover, be sure to look around a bit, you might find hidden treasures that are owned locally, and you can get a “slice” that’s almost as big as a pizza. But just go ahead and order the whole thing, because you are going to want to take some of that home and have it for a midnight snack later. Marozzi’s also delivers if you live within their delivery area and catering is available. 

www.marozzispizzeria.com
Marozzi's Pizzeria on Urbanspoon